1974 LAND ROVER MOUNTAIN RESCUE

LIGHTWEIGHT 88 RHD

$20,000

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

This Land Rover Lightweight was one of 14,000 produced between 1968 and 1984 and designed specifically to be transported by cargo helicopter, resulting in a smaller footprint than the commercial series III models.

First designed in the early 60’s the Royal Marines and British Army required a vehicle that could be carried by air. They had taken delivery of the Westland Wessex helicopter which could carry an 1140 kg (2500 lb) load slung beneath.  The smallest Land Rover available at the time was a Series IIA 88 inch (2235 mm) wheelbase, which was too heavy. A new modification to the basic Series IIA was devised by making many body components easily detachable and removing many non-essential items. The result was the Land Rover Half-Ton, known widely as the Lightweight or Airportable.

From its authentic markings, shovels, pick axe, and canvas top this mountain rescue Lightweight looks just as it would have in the 1970’s. This handsome 1979 Lightweight is in great condition inside and out.

ENGINE:

This right hand drive Lightweight is fitted with the standard 2.25L inline four military petrol engine that starts easily, runs great and is very reliable.  You would not be afraid to take this vehicle into the back country.  

CHASSIS:

The undercarriage is solid with very minor surface rust.

EXTERIOR:

The body panels are strait and rust free. Paint is a thick green military paint and there are some areas that are chipping on the bumper and windscreen frame as shown in pictures. The doors are in great shape and have zero rust in the panels as well as the bottom edge of the door and window frame.

INTERIOR:

The seats both front and in the rear are in excellent shape.  All gauges switches and controls work as they should.  The Canvas top is in excellent shape with clear plastic windows.

This amazing piece of history would be a great addition to any collection.

4930 E 2550 N EDEN, UT 84310

801.917.3857

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